What's the Solution? Why a Five-Minute Prayer Time Isn't Enough (Part 2)

Last week's blog entry was pivotal for me. I literally felt God's Spirit re-directing me to his heart regarding how I view the amount of time I needed to spend with Him in prayer. It is quite amazing to experience a direct revelation from God. 

It's quite challenging, as well.

See, after I realized that God was requiring much more of us...more of ME than I anticipated, I then had questions...LOTS of questions... When do I start? Do I need to go two FULL hours?! How do I even last two hours in prayer.

Then I became anxious. 

I realized that I had turned over an entirely new concept and had no idea what to do with it. NONE!

So, this evening, as I wind down the day with my Birthday Man (My husband's birthday is TODAY) I was trying to process, how this would happen. 

Then it hit me. 

Building the type of effective prayer and devotional life I need to meet the demands of life and ministry doesn't come from striving, it is gifted to us for asking. 

I think it's so sweet that we're reading John 4, today. Here is a classic example of God radically changing a person's perception and approach to need. A woman minding her business encounters a stranger at a well. She actually has no interest in anything other than the water she has come to draw. 

Her timing and lack of company indicate her reality, yet, she is content to continue doing the same thing in the same way with the same sorry result. Exactly how many times had she been to this well? How many gallons of the same hot water had she drawn from there?

We cannot possibly know how long she's frequented this well but the one who formed her in her mother's womb had been watching and determined today would be the day for an intervention. 

John 4:7-14
 

Soon a Samaritan woman came to draw water, and Jesus said to her, “Please give me a drink.” He was alone at the time because his disciples had gone into the village to buy some food. The woman was surprised, for Jews refuse to have anything to do with Samaritans. She said to Jesus, “You are a Jew, and I am a Samaritan woman. Why are you asking me for a drink?” Jesus replied, “If you only knew the gift God has for you and who you are speaking to, you would ask me, and I would give you living water.”  “But sir, you don’t have a rope or a bucket,” she said, “and this well is very deep. Where would you get this living water? And besides, do you think you’re greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us this well? How can you offer better water than he and his sons and his animals enjoyed?” Jesus replied, “Anyone who drinks this water will soon become thirsty again. But those who drink the water I give will never be thirsty again. It becomes a fresh, bubbling spring within them, giving them eternal life.”
 

Jesus has introduced a notion to this woman that she has not ever even considered; a source and resource of blessing installed inside of her. What a concept. That God could place within her the very source of refreshing that she tried to extract from the men she'd been in relationship with. Her curiosity is piqued and she poses the question that I believe is the key to us moving deeper and forward with our "Upgrade".

 “Please, sir,” the woman said, “give me this water! Then I’ll never be thirsty again, and I won’t have to come here to get water.” John 4:15

Of course that statement doesn't complete the story, but it does put a crack in the doorway of this woman's heart that Jesus took the opportunity to fill. 

I believe it goes this way:

  1. Jesus initiates contact.

  2. Jesus creates thirst.

  3. Jesus fills thirst.

I'm so super glad it's not up to us to figure this thing out... Now that our appetites have been made ready to receive the fullness of God's presence, God will actually lead and guide us into His truth on all of what we're desiring. He creates the thirst. He quenches the thirst.  

Prayer:
God, I now know that you've created a desire for me to draw closer to you so that YOU can fill it. Please draw me close and keep me near. 

Lola MooreComment